Dan’s opinion

Dan
J@g.com
(I alternated the commentator ISP..4.1…1..1.1. This was listed four days ago.)

I’m so glad to see your book doing so well. I’m also glad you didn’t listen to the naysayers and let them defer you with their grumbling. You kept the course. That’s the hallmark of a true author. That’s how any author will make their book do well. You can’t spend all your time chattering with your online friends and posting pictures of your pets and expect your book to do well even if you are traditional published.

The main element I see pushing and propelling it, is that it is different. It’s isn’t about the supernatural elements so popular today. It’s new and different. The author pointed out there’s many more supernatural elements out there beside werewolves and vampires and a heck of a lot scarier. I for one was tired of the same scenario over and over in the paranormal genre. It’s very refreshing someone take the time to learn what else is out there. This was not a book which was quickly written.

Although, it’s a fictional it has a big healthy dash of realism in the work. I like the fact you wrote it as the world really is. You didn’t pacifier anything. I read some parts might offend a few who have never experienced life and think things are really as idea as they seems. But for us seasoned folks. We know exactly what you are talking about. That took courage. I’m glad you didn’t go overboard with the dystopian elements and turn it into the Walking Dead, Mad Max or the Apocalypse. I don’t think this fit into one particular genre. I have never read anything quite like it.

I found it new in how the book explained things in a way so many authors forget to explain regarding the traits of their characters and the character’s life. Which leaves the reader wondering how they accomplished such great feat with no resources? Even in fantasy you have to sound somewhat believable.

They never explained how the hero or heroine got back into the city of their birth to avenge the death of their loved ones. When the last you read about them they were a poor pauper in the streets or in a cave with the royal family loyal servant whom the evil king was seeking? How did they go from the impoverished youth in a cave to He-man in a matter of paragraphs?

And I’m glad you didn’t write elves let them in or fairies twinkled them into a guarded fortress. And thank you for not saying a dragon flew them in or they mysteriously learn karate and whipped everyone’s butt at the gate and burst in on the king who killed their father and killed him.

Another thing I noticed you rarely see in literature today. A truly noble heroine, so many heroine’s are depicted as some sort of impossible tough woman, man hater. This author portrayed that a woman can be tough when she needs to be tough but yet still be a lady.

Finally somebody wrote a story for grown ups. It’s about time. I must say it isn’t a story for anyone easily offended. But it worth the read. Congratulations. I look forward to the second installment.

 

 

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About unholypursuit

A. White is a long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly who has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga," which should be finished this year. She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book came from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
This entry was posted in Book reviews., Free book, novel, paranormal romance,, Personal thoughts, romance, Supernatural. Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to Dan’s opinion

  1. Thank you Dan, I asked you for a review and I really, truly appreciate your taking the time out of your busy schedule to read it and write a review. I’m sorry about the way it didn’t show up. I had to input it for some reason it was stuck in the back. I won’t deny when I was referred to you I was a little intimidated and the wait made me a little nervous. I don’t have any fairies, dragons, or elves in my story for it isn’t that type of fantasy, romantic, paranormal novel. It wasn’t written to offend anyone and I hope no one find anything offensive. It was based upon fictional real life; for life is often stranger than fiction.

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  2. Oh yes, in case anyone is wondering which book? It’s a review of the first one. “Unholy Pursuit: Devil on my Trail.”

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  3. Alisha says:

    I received this book via The Muses Port as a complimentary read. And I don’t hand out compliments like a doctor’s office dole out lollipops to kids. But I have to say this book is written from a very different from any perspective than any I have ever read. Yes, it’s a romance story but it’s totally different from the traditional romance stories. It’s paranormal and horror story too but it isn’t in a competition to gross you out.

    The most startling thing I find is you don’t realize what you just read and what it is actually saying until you have read it and move on to the next paragraph. It’s the kind of book that makes you ponder because it seems so everyday. That it make you wonders can this possible happened or is this real?

    I don’t know who have been giving you a hard time about the book but whomever they were have about as much intelligent as a rock. So ignore them.

    The best I can describe it is this book is like a cooking, if you add too much of one spice or seasoning it kills the effect you are going for. But if you blend them all together in just the right amount you have a tasty dish. Some part reminded me of Terry McMillian, Toni Morrison, Nora Hurston, and Alice Walker, especially the parts of Ana dealing with her dysfunctional family. But these people have a certifiable reason to behave as they do. I don’t see how anyone in that family is able to function effectively considering all they have been through.

    Bea is totally adorable but Bea is an adorable little devil. No child should have endure what poor Bea have been through. My heart aches profoundly for Bea. I hope it doesn’t scar her for life.

    Nikola is a pure, misogynistic psychopath with no redeeming qualities. There are no excuses for his behavior.

    Azazel is the very epitome of “Heaven don’t want me and hell is afraid I will take over.” He’s like dealing with a wild, fieriness lion in it’s natural habitat. Although, Ana is sweet but she is not weak. She sets his wild ass straight everytime. Somebody needs to. LOL!!

    The colorful comedy is hilarious. You can only gasp and then laugh. I don’t know what to say about some dialogues.

    Ok, I will quit. I don’t want to give too much away. But it is a fun read. But also very deep and thoughtful.

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  4. Alisha says:

    I never seen the word MASSAGONIST used in a novel before

    Sociologist Michael Flood, at the University of Wollongong, defines misogyny as the hatred of women, and notes: Though most common in men, misogyny also exists in and is practiced by women against other women or even themselves.

    It really something women need to think about.

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  5. Mac says:

    Dan said, ”

    I found it new in how the book explained things in a way so many authors forget to explain regarding the traits of their characters and the character’s life. Which leaves the reader wondering how they accomplished such great feat with no resources? Even in fantasy you have to sound somewhat believable.

    They never explained how the hero or heroine got back into the city of their birth to avenge the death of their loved ones. When the last you read about them they were a poor pauper in the streets or in a cave with the royal family loyal servant whom the evil king was seeking? How did they go from the impoverished youth in a cave to He-man in a matter of paragraphs?

    I never said anything but I had wondered these things, too? I know if you are writing a 200 page book you have to wrap it up quickly to save space but it would be nice if the character was fleshed out more. At least tell how they arrived at a particular point.

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    • Mac and Dan, often with shorter novels the author has fill in as many precise details as possible with a limited amount of words. So I think some may skip or summarizes years of the character’s life to move on to the main apex of the story. We see this all the time in movies. Readers may be responsible for so much being left out. Some readers do not want to know the in depth details about the character. They want the book to jump right into the middle of action. So I think each author has to write to appease their readers’ base.

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