Advice asked.

    At a nearby community center several towns over from my own.  I was asked to speak to a group of aspiring authors. Actual the invitation was two months ago but the show up date was a few weeks ago. I had never spoken before a group like this before. Usually I’m at a book signing when I meet the public. So, I was a little nervous.

 

   I made bulletin points of what needs to be done to get your literary work to the world. But while speaking I noticed several people had copies of my books on their lap. I think to myself, “I hope they know is a community motivation speech, not a book club meet?” Although, I wasn’t allowed to talk about my books but that was ok. I understood I was there to inspire others.

 

    When finished speaking one woman raised her hand and asked how was she supposed to do all these things listed and go to work, cook, take care of her kids, market, write cover letters, faced the rejections from publishers, and the whole nine yards.

 

      I asked her did she really want to share her thoughts with the world?

 

     “Yes, that’s why I took creative writing classes.”

 

      “Then set aside time for writing.  You don’t have to be every single day. Most people don’t have the luxury to write every day, all day. Little by little put your story together.”

 

     A man asked how was he expected to spend several thousands on a book which he didn’t know if he would get his ROI out of it?

 

    All I could tell him was that no one knows for sure how the public will respond to a book but I do recommend it being edited by someone who knows how to edit books.

 

   Then he asked how long have I been doing this?

 

   I told him I have writing for over twenty years. I recently decided to publish the work.

 

    “I doubt I have twenty years left in my life. I’m 66 years old. I don’t have twenty years to wait to see if anyone like it.”

 

    I told him about self-publishing and how to market to his local audience before spending a lot of money on marketing elsewhere. Marketing and editing can be very expensive. Everyone cry about professional editing but no one will truthfully tell you how much it cost and without a publishing firm the individual cost can run into the thousands depending upon the size of the book. I was truthful with the audience. I didn’t tell them as some speakers have been known to do regarding these things. I was upfront with them. I told them that the marketing is harder than the writing.

     Some of the published independent authors voiced their opinion. They were complaining about how reviews can make or break your book and how difficult it is to get a review. One woman said, “Independent self-published authors do not have deep pockets to buy reviews. They don’t have deep pockets to pay for editing that may not ROI on the money invested. So, what do you do then? Since some people won’t bother to read a book if it isn’t nearly perfect?

    The only answer I had was the standard was set by the big publishing companies years ago but still go ahead and do what they can afford. A book can always be revised and updated and they often are. That’s why the first edition is always the most valuable. This is not a set-in stone law. Many who later became famous such as Poe and Frost did their own publishing in the beginning. People told them they had to follow the guidelines set by the powerhouses of their day. They didn’t listen to them and delivered to the world some of the most astonishing tales and poems.

I believe that there will someone who finds your work fascinating. It may not be the mainstream but your book will fall into the lap of someone who can relate to it. That’s how every author finds their own audience, their own nook in the book world.

Another piece of advice I gave, like it or not, know who you are sending what to on the internet.  Do not send information to a publishing firm or author, independent or traditional with no mentioning of their work. That is one of the quickest ways to get ignored. Take the time to get to know other authors. Compliment their work. Read it. No, not all of them are going to read your work but they will have a less unfavorable view toward you when they see your work on the internet.

I didn’t try to tell anyone it would be easy to get your work out there.Again, marketing is harder than writing. What I was attempting to do war encourage others to continue to write and maybe one day one of your books will be read by millions. 

 

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About unholypursuit

A. White is a long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly who has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga," which should be finished this year. She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book came from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
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One Response to Advice asked.

  1. Alisha White says:

    That’s great advice. I sensed many online editing firms didn’t like it but it’s true. The average indie author doesn’t have thousands of dollars simply lying around the house to spend on a book that may or may not make a return on their investment. That’s pretty much saying if you can’t afford a professional editors then you have no business writing or you don’t have anything to say. That’s same prejudice attitude which has kept so many probably great writers out of this agenda for hundreds of years. Only a small percentage are able to make a break through and the vast majority of them has been white males. We readers have to really search for anyone’s perspective on a subject. And some are like me, simply gave up looking.

    Sure, when ebooks first came out about 15-17 years ago there were lots of bad books being sold but nowadays you will have to really be looking, digging for faults in a book to find one that is horribly edited or not edited at all. This appears moreso the push of the major publishing firms to squeeze indies out the market.

    All the editing in the world isn’t going to make a crappy, repetitive storyline book become a great read. Shakespeare could raise from the grave and edit it and it still would be crappy. If they want to recapture the readers then start putting out interesting, original stories.

    One way indies have an advantage over others is they are free to write however they choose. You see the person’s own uniqueness in the story not a carbon copy of everyone else. Their stories are more original. That’s what’s propelled them into stardom. Readers were tired of the same old story over and over, only changing the name and description of the character.

    I think you gave these people useful realistic advice and encouragement not the Pie-the-Sky crap so many motivational speakers give.

    Ok, I stepping down off my soap box.

    On Wed, Jul 12, 2017 at 6:35 AM, The Novel: UnHoly Pursuit: Devil on my Tra

    Like

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