My Darling Clementine

I noticed as a child that all the best known nursery rhymes were actually quite morbid, scary and depressing. Everything from Rock-a-bye baby to Ring Around the Roses. I started looking at older books for the original version and saw how they originally went and I was like “Wow, no wonder my mother don’t sing them to us. She made up her own.”

 

Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

In a cavern, in a canyon
Excavating for a mine
Dwelt a miner, forty-niner
And his daughter, Clementine

Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

Light she was and like a fairy
And her shoes were number nine
Herring boxes, without topses
Sandals were for Clementine
Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

Drove she ducklings to the water
Ev’ry morning just at nine
Hit her foot against a splinter
Fell into the foaming brine

Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

Ruby lips above the water
Blowing bubbles, soft and fine
But, alas, I was no swimmer
So I lost my Clementine

Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

How I missed her! How I missed her
How I missed my Clementine
But I kissed her little sister
I forgot my Clementine

Oh my darling, oh my darling
Oh my darling, Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine

In my dreams now she does haunt me
robed in garments soaked with brine
then she rises from the waters
and I kiss my clementine

——————-
The song has many versions. In one version her father takes his life when he become overcome with grief. Yes most folk song are very morbid.

Later Version of Clementine

———————–

At first the song seems to be a sad ballad sung by a bereaved lover about the loss of his darling, the daughter of a miner during the 1849 California Gold Rush but as it goes on this isn’t a nice song although it supposed to be a contribute to a lost love. Old version tell that she fell into an excavating mine not drowned.

The verse about the shoe doesn’t mean she worn a size nine shoe. It mean fine, meaning her shoe was attracted, like we say dressed to the nine.

I think this verse is a little mean but this was sometime in 1849 so who knows what people consisted mean back then.

How I missed her! How I missed her
How I missed my Clementine
But I kissed her little sister
I forgot my Clementine

Don’t sound to me like she was gone very long before the songster kissed her little sister and forgot her. But she comes back to haunt him I assume for not at least trying to save her and kissing her little sister. This guy really need to learn to keep his lips to himself. 

It took a lot of searching but I found the last of the song that’s often omitted and I see why?

Then the miner, forty-niner
Soon began to peak and pine
Thought he oughta join his daughter
Now he’s with his Clementine
Oh, my darling, oh, my darling
Oh, my darling Clementine
You are lost and gone forever
Dreadful sorry, Clementine
There’s a churchyard on the hillside
Where the flowers grow and twine
There grow roses, ‘mongst the posies
Fertilized by Clementine

Advertisements

About unholypursuit

A. White, a former librarian who is also long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
This entry was posted in Folklore, life, music, paranormal romance,, romance, Songs, spirits, Supernatural and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to My Darling Clementine

  1. Alisha says:

    This song has to be a tongue in the cheek parody. I hope no one’s mind actually worked this way. What’s a foaming brine?

    On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 12:01 PM, The Novel: UnHoly Pursuit: Devil on my Tra

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Alisha White says:

    Ok, it’s water saturated with or containing large amounts of a salt, especially sodium chloride. I thought they mined for gold near rivers…why would brine be in a river? The original version makes more sense. It says she fell in a cavern or mining hole. The only brine would be in a river is a tsunami hit….I’m beginning to wonder was this girl murdered?

    Liked by 1 person

    • LOL! I didn’t say by science the songs made sense. I long ago suspected it may been a song about a murder. Remember this was the wild, wild west and I presume it was wiser to keep your mouth shut if you didn’t want to end up in the cavern or brine too.

      Like

  3. Salt has been used to process ores in the mining practice, so it’s only reasonable that salt would be found in streams that were used of mining. The streams were likely highly polluted with a variety of chemicals as a result of mining practices. Ah, the good old days…

    Like

    • Thank you Mallory for clearing that up for the rest of us. I admit, I’d no idea why brine would be found in a mine or in a river nor where it came from. I imagine the water was quite polluted since there was no EPA in the 1850’s. If the mining was making the water supply undrinkable then that explains why so many towns sprung up and died in a few short years and are now ghost towns.

      Like

  4. Amanda Stevens says:

    I still say this girl was murdered and her father knew it but was unable to do anything about it as to why he killed himself.

    On Wed, Jul 18, 2018 at 12:01 PM, The Novel: UnHoly Pursuit: Devil on my Tra

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.