Are You A Book Snob?

I had no idea there was such a thing as a book snob. I had no idea if you did not read Young Adult you are considered a book snob.

King James Bible (1 Corinthians 13:11)
When I was a child, I spake as a child, I understood as a child, I thought as a child: but when I became a man, I put away childish things.

No, most adults aren’t book snobs, it’s that they have already read what young people are just now reading. I read “Lord of the Flies” and “Lord of The Rings” in 3rd and 4th grade. I was so sick of “Lord of The Rings” by the time the class finished reading it that I was exhausted, and apparently I wasn’t the only one in the class who was exhausted for everyday when the bell rung we all rushed out the class room like the office workers in the opening of the old, “Drew Carey” sitcom. LOL!

My teachers made us decipher allegedly hidden codes or messages perhaps in the book. Everything from what did the color of such and such represent? To what it meant to the adventures to find what they seek? One question I remembers? What Frodo Baggins, a the young well-to-do hobbit meant when he said such and such. I can’t remember what she asked me about what he said. LOL! To things like what was Gandalf the Grey, a wizard best known for among hobbits besides his fireworks and mischievous sense of humor? Who was the most powerful wizard of the Middle-earth? To talk about Samwise “Sam” Gamgee a hobbit, Frodo’s gardener at home, and his servant and friend on the quest for what?.

But as an adult I thanks her now for being so hard on me. It caused me develop an outstanding attention span. And it helped me to get into a habit of looking for symbolism in a book.

Perhaps had she left me alone and let me read it without having a class discussion of every other paragraph I might had enjoyed it more.

So, the next time you see a person above 25 reading Lord Alfred Tennyson, instead of the latest YA, don’t automatically assume they are a book snob it’s just that they grew up. They have already read what you are just now reading and when you have raised a family and worked a real life job and paid bills your perspective in life changes and so does your reading material.

Occasionally, I still read a YA.  But not as often as I read them as a child and early teen. I set aside days for traditional YA because even as a child I was reading things like “Les Miserables, Macbeth, The Life of Mahatma Gandhi or Nelson Mandela, Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf, Steinbeck, The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams and etc., I remember reading a book called “The Main Ingredient” but can’t remember who wrote it.

I guess I was a kid more like Sheldon from the “Big Bang Theory”. the so-called traditional children books didn’t interest me. I remember when I was five and my teachers were trying to get me to read, “Dr. Seuss’ “Cat in the Hat.” I said, “No, I don’t want to read it. I’ve already read it.”

I believe different families have different critiques for their children’ reading materials. Just because a family select advance reading materials for their children doesn’t make it abnormal if a parent or child select reading beyond that which is typical for their age group. It doesn’t mean the family is snobbish. I think it’s wrong to hold a child back to appease others’ expectations. If that child is more advanced than his or her’ peers let them express their interests. Let them soar to their greatest potential. To dumb them down to fit in with their peers is wrong. It kills their intellect.

 

 

 

 

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About unholypursuit

A. White, a former librarian who is also long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
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39 Responses to Are You A Book Snob?

  1. 3rd Grade
    The Hobbit: 304 pages.
    The Fellowship of the Ring: 479 pages.
    4th Grade
    The Two Towers: 415 pages.
    The Return of the King: 347 pages- by the time the class finished “Lord of the Rings”, we 8 and 9 year olds had read 1,545 and plus analyzed them. The movie wasn’t made back then so we couldn’t watch what wasn’t made.

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    • Lula says:

      Ugh, I hate Lord of the rings! These are people who don’t have to deal with the real world who can still run around acting like a child. I hope for their sake they die before their parents or husbands and never have to face it because in the real world your boss may test your intelligence on things like how much you know about the classics. I think Eugene O’Neil is who you’re looking for.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I am a bookworm. I love to read. I am 24 and I do read the classics as in romanticism and before that time period and still read some children’s books. I also read mystery and fantasy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, and welcome. Thank you for your reply. I believe leaving it to each person their own taste in books. I read children books too at age 24 but I was reading them to my child and often had to read the same story over and over. 🙂

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      • Why should it matter what a person’s tastes in books is?

        Liked by 1 person

        • Some believe that as a person matures their taste for reading changes. I can’t speak for everyone but I must say my taste changed from my tween years to my teens. Lots of people goes for high profile jobs and sometime those in position to make or break your career wants to know these things about you. What do you read? Mainly because you are representing their company and if you have to meet with a well-rounded client or the boss they might strike up a conversation on this issue. You never know. It’s a way of preparing people for the real work force depending on what your career might be.

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          • My taste for fantasy has existed since childhood- so that one has not changed.

            The classics- those have come from the Romanticism time period and before. I started reading those in college despite being raised on one: my family watches A Christmas Carol every Christmas Break (that is the one I was raised on)

            Mystery: I do not remember when my taste for mysteries began

            Liked by 1 person

            • Yes, I know all about A Christmas Carol. I don’t think there’s a Dickens story I haven’t read. I really don’t I have a specific genre. I reads all mostly anything. I read a little bit of everything if the story is interesting. Some books I have read I don’t know what genre they fitted into. Yes, I have read a lot of work from the Romanticism period such as Wordsworth, Longfellow, Hawthorn, and many others.

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    • I hope you don’t mind but I just viewed your site and couldn’t help but noticed it’s about the same things I’m inputting fictionally in my book series.

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        • I just read your posts that’s all. I read everyone posts to get to know them better. 🙂

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          • These characters I love. My antagonist, Sarge, I strongly dislike him. Writing a book is hard

            Liked by 1 person

            • Yes, writing a book is hard but it’s rewarding. Who is Sarge. Antagonists are written to be disliked. 🙂

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              • My antagonist in my book

                Liked by 1 person

                • What’s the name of your book?

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                  • Has not title yet- right now referring to it as “Fairy Frogs and Toads”. Eventually will have a title. I am only am on my 1st draft after all

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • That’s great. I was just reading your outline of characters. Don’t worry you will come up with a name. It takes time to think of clever plots, twists and turns but the more you write the easier ideas comes to you.

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                    • I do not know if it will know into a series or not. I have to be careful at times: don’t forget it is a children’s book after all

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Yes, with children’ books one has to stay within material appropriate contents for children. I don’t think many small children books grow into series nowadays. Pre-teen and early teenagers books do.

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                    • My book is meant ages 8-12: that’s the age range.

                      Look: my antagonist, Sarge, is a bully. His mother left him at a young age. His father was the leader of the toads. His father never loved him and terribly mistreated him. Soon enough, his father left him. Sarge is jealous of his cousin, Marge, who has a better family situation, so she became an easy target. He put all his anger on both the Fairy Frogs and the Toads. He is jealous of Marge and the talent the Fairy Frogs have. It is hard to write him as a bully in a children’s book

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • I can image it is hard to write about a bullying situation. But from what we gathers about Sarge he can be helped if someone step up and show him love. He’s reflecting back all that’s ever been shown to him. Perhaps he wouldn’t bully people if anyone showed him affection. The little guy had it tough, mom doesn’t want him, dad doesn’t want him. So he’s projecting his pain on others.

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                    • He is 17 years old. His cousin is 15.

                      Look, he is blind to many things. He knows where Fairy Creek is. He has seen the Fairy Frogs showing compassion and love to the Toads, but he is blind to the fact that it is compassion and love. Aires, the leader of the Frogs has tried to teach him. Boy, he is so blind. He has become too much like his father. He hired Norg as a spy, Norg has stepped down from that.

                      This is terrible: His own cousin: his family member- plus his own kind- all the toads. He spends the entire book trying to break up the friendship the fairy frogs have between all the toads. Sparkle only befriended Marge all because of how Sarge treated her.

                      He needs to put his anger into something else- my Fairy Frogs whenever they get angry and jealous they put it into their artwork. They are deeply compassionate. Boy, boy, boy.

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • I think it’s a good theme to show people that despite what happened to you early in life that’s no reason to mistreat others. I can’t say I don’t see where his anger is coming from. As a reader I don’t see him as being blind. I see him as in pain. Perhaps a reader reading this would sympathize with him asking where were all this love when he was being mistreated which turned him into who he became.

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                    • Look at him: he is my antagonist: he just can’t see it yet. This is a children’s book. At one point, he was Marge’s uncle. Then someone made me realize something: it would be much better in a children’s book: to make Marge and Sarge cousins: I changed it to make them cousins.

                      Aires in the beginning made one rule: never interact with the toads or enter Graysloup: he just assumed all the toads were rude and disrespectful. My protagonist (Sparkle) only broke the rules all because of how invested she in her craft. Then she soon realized how much Sarge is mistreating Marge: Sparkle took compassion a step further: she befriended Marge: Marge needed compassion and a friend: Marge felt like an outsider before: Sparkle did the right thing

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • It’s up to you as the writer to make your character see the point of view you’re attempting to steer him or her into. Now, be aware characters have a tendency to develop a mind of their owns. LOL!

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                    • My main character, Sparkle, always has her mind of her own. She has asked recently asked Aires to go back to Graysloup. Aires is an Uncle to Darcy, a loving Uncle to him. Sparkle seems to have picked up on the fact that Sarge has had a horrible childhood growing up. Sparkle has begged Aires show Sarge some love and compassion. She is worried Sarge will capture those toads again: she is begging Aires to help Sarge out: she knows Aires and his relationship to Darcy: so she wants him to bring that affection and love to Sarge.

                      Sparkle has a mind of her own at times: she goes above and beyond at times it seems

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Don’t be surprised when you sat down to write and Sparkle start telling you all the bad things she did while you were asleep and then you ask her how are you supposed to fit that into the story? And she shrugs her shoulders saying, “I was just telling you what I did. I didn’t say I knew how to make it fit.” LOL!

                      Can’t the toads fight off a 17 year old? Is he a warrior or something?

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                    • All my characters are either a Fairy Frog or a Toad

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                    • Oh, ok. I see. What age group are you writing for?

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                    • That age group love stories about make believe kingdoms and magical creatures.

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                    • It isn’t a make believe kingdom, but a make believe world. They live in The Cattail World with two main locations- Fairy Creek and Graysloup

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Okay, does kingdoms exist in this make-believe world?

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                    • not really, there is a leader of the Fairy Frogs (Aires) and a leader of the toads (Sarge). So it just has the make believe creature part

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • I hope you don’t mind continuing this discussion on a miscellaneous page since the original.

                      https://unholypursuit.wordpress.com/miscellaneous-topics/

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  3. Flo says:

    Oh, because your parents didn’t want you too grow up and being a dumbass that makes you a book snob? Only a dumbass would think it’s OK to read something written for kids once you’re over 15-17 years old:-)

    Liked by 1 person

    • I believe leaving it to each their own taste in reading. It’s so difficult to get people to read anything in the days of instant messages and tweets. I just didn’t being referred as a book snob because of my own taste in reading.

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