Don’t overexert the pain and suffering.

I am mentioning this for I keep reading it over and over in novels. When writing about pain and suffering and the characters doesn’t have any extra ordinary abilities to protect themselves. Please do not overexert the pain issue into the realm of unbelievably if the character is supposedly a normal person with no special powers.

I know it’s done all the time in movies but they only have a few hours to present a movie. That’s not the case with a book. I often read accounts where the subject is being constantly abused through out the entire book but that doesn’t slow down their activity.

Yes, there have been thousands of cases of people surviving constant abuse under the worst scenario, cruelty beyond that a normal person can conjure but they didn’t survive it physically whole. There were many scars and injuries left behind that plagued them the rest of their life.

The stories I am talking about the heroes or heroines have no scars, broken bones, welts, burns, missing teeth broken jaw or nose, they are still dashing, handsome, and beautiful and some of these books are on best seller lists by prominent publishing firms and I’m wondering if they didn’t catch that abnormality in the book?

If you are going to write that into a story find some way to explain why they don’t look like they have been beaten and how they continue to run, fight, jump and leap after suffering abuse daily?

That’s one of the reason I don’t read some books about warriors. There’s no way the hero is going to walk away from a powerful bomb exploding, throwing them fifty feet in the air with just minor bruises or often no injuries at all. That’s not what “being thrown clear” means. It means the bomb didn’t kill the person but they suffered some injuries.

I am reading a lot of stories about abuse and suffering. I don’t care how young, muscular, healthy, hefty, or fit the person is, someone much larger who is constantly beating or kicking them is going to break bones and create scars. They’ll suffer disfiguring broken bones and if not set back properly it will lame them for life. Even in fictional written in realism, you have to use some reality.

If the story is going to written in realism you have to keep it there. You can’t add fantasy attributes into a realism story and that’s what many writers do. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. This is a common scene in books about a so-call person who never so much been out of their neighborhood but yet all of a suddenly turns into Xena or Hercules but the story is supposedly based in realism with the character having no exceptional strength or power. Yes, an adrenaline rush can do a lot but there are some things it can’t.

Apparently, these people have never been in a real life fight. Then they would know it take a lot of stamina to whip your opponent’s butt. People don’t go down easily with one or two blows. (Unless one of the fighters is far stronger than the other and shouldn’t be fighting them to begin with. But if they are equally endowed, it’s going to be a drag, down, knock fight before the winner wins.)  And you aren’t walking away with no bruises from just one fight so do the math, of how many bruises you will have from fighting everyday.

As an avid reader and a writer, I am not criticizing to make anyone feel bad. I am pointing out things to improve your story. If I didn’t care about your improvements I would keep this to myself and not say a word.

A good book to read to understand the incapacity which pain renders on a person is “Misery” by Stephen King and I read another one recently, I can’t remember the name of it but the author did a great job in describing the injuries and how they affected the main character’s life and actions.

I recently read a book about orphans living in a place ran by nuns and according to the story these kids were merciless beaten daily but yet were not maimed. I know according to the story they are sold off as servants once they reached a certain age but still the severity of the beatings described…no one is walking away unmarred.

One incident is where a piece of iron is heated so hot it is glowing white when it brushed the girl’s leg but yet, the burn can be treated with a salve without leaving a mark. No, that’s not going to happen. Iron heated to that degree is going to burn a hole in the flesh and, instantly cauterized the flesh not merely burning it and leave a nasty blister.

I know it’s hard to write in a realism concept some readers say they want stories written in but yet do not want the description of the character’s life to go on too long. But remember, it’s you who is signing your name to the work not anyone else and it’s you the author who should determine the fullest of it. Just as I saw that impossibility, someone else in the future may see it too and say the same thing. “That’s impossible!”

Try something like, someone had a change of heart and helped the hero or heroine and gave them a chance to recover. That only takes a few paragraphs, if that much. And when they recovered they resume their fighting.

The reversal of this can be equally as bad. Some under develop this part until you lose interest in the story. The hero is so meek they get their butt kick all day, on every page, from page to page, so much until you wonders when will they grow a backbone and fight back? Let them win a few and lose a few fights. To balance out the story. Let them have enough sense to run if their opponent is far more powerful. There’s a vast difference between bravery and stupidity. 

For example; in the “Unholy Pursuit Saga,” for this very reason is why I keep mentioning Ana’s scars, aches, and pains from previous injuries, alleged accidents, and battles. I talks about her callous hands from hard labor to illustrate the harshness of her life.

Yes, she’s gifted but doesn’t have the gift to heal herself although, she can at times heal others.

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About unholypursuit

A. White, a former librarian who is also long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
This entry was posted in actor, anger, hope, pain and suffering, Personal thoughts and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Don’t overexert the pain and suffering.

  1. Alisha says:

    I know what you are saying. I have read such accounts as this also. Some take it too far.

    Liked by 1 person

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