Please no more dead or dying moms book plots.

It seems as thus almost every book I’ve read for a while started out with a dead Mom. Somehow she’s dead or in the process of dying. Mom died horribly in an accident. Kid killed her. Dad killed her. Mom died in childbirth. Mom was murdered by a stranger. Believe me, there are many  more interesting plots out there other than Dead Moms [ or dead wives is another favorite one.] So, Please no more dead moms or dying moms plots. Come on I know writers can get more creative than that.

If it isn’t a story about orphans then there’s no need for a dead mom to be in the story.

Hmm, I’m beginning to wonder if the Young Adult genre like Moms very much? It doesn’t appear like it. It seems to me that in this genre  Moms are anguish of everyone’s ire and suffering.

How about this plot? How about a plot where the Anguish Causing Mom start killing some of these ruthless characters back and see how they like those apples? You know… kill them all off Sarah Connor style: The fictional character in the Terminator franchise.

I mentioned this overused plot because I’ve picked up and read at least 20 books and it was the same plot. Dead Moms.

 

About unholypursuit

A. White, an award winning former librarian who is also long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
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27 Responses to Please no more dead or dying moms book plots.

  1. Yes, there seem to be a lot of dead parents in YA books. I think it’s a convenient trope since teenagers are supposed to be the protagonists and problem-solvers. (Without too many exceptions, adults in YA stories are useless). Death is a quick and easy way to get parents out of the way and put the responsibility of “saving the world” on the teens. Maybe dads can be remote and caught up in their careers, but moms need to be dead. Lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Can you explain why the Moms have to be dead? I believe the teen can still be the protagonists and problem-solvers. Yes, death to a character is a quick and easy way to get a character’s relationship to another out of the way but it isn’t the only way.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Of course, then don’t have to be dead. But as a mom, I’d be trying to help my teenager in any way possible. I’d be fierce! Taking on the bad guys myself. The only way to get me out of the book would be to kill me. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        • I see your point. I’ll remember that the next time I pick up a young adult novel. I’ve written three books where the child is protagonist in the story but the parents aren’t dead all it takes is a little creative thinking as to what you will do with the family or rest of the family.

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    • Walgris says:

      Unless the YA main protagonist have super hero powers, an dystopian society or Orphanage novel– how are they going to live without a parent in the story? The Metamorphosis a novella written by Franz Kafka published in 1915 is a fictional story of a YA. It shows how he’s living. They’re a terrible family and isn’t an example of kindness but nonetheless, it shows interactions between relatives. Well, come to think of it..one would be better off parentless than dealing with a family like the one in The Metamorphosis.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Walgris says:

      I’m afraid I’m going to have to disagree with you that adults are useless in YA novels. Some of the best YA novels have adults in them. The adultless novels a relatively new and disturbing concept.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Bredan says:

      😆 I want my teens to solve the problem of cleaning their room, doing chores, and not asking me for money. When they can solve those problems that’s when I will think about letting th fight off evil bandits with magic.😉

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Walgris says:

    I’m glad somebody finally said it. I know I was starting to find that trend a little distrubing but I thought I wa alone. I’ve read a few where the author is cteative in keeping the family out of the graveyard.

    Like

    • I hope no one takes it as I’m saying it shouldn’t be used at all. In some situations it sets the tempo for the story but not every story. I’m saying leave the well-beaten path and make your novel stand out from the crowd. If you aren’t being backed by a major power house publishing company who has a hundred year old fan base then you need to do as Co Co Chanel said, “make your work different and memorable” It’s boring reading the same story again and again only changing the character’s name and maybe clothing and etc. I’m another writer as well as a reader. The said applies to the sci-fi genre. It’s the same prop in every story.

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    • Bredan says:

      I wish someone would tell the urban romance novels that every black mother isn’t a thot, a hoe or a bitch. Sometimes the story be interesting but the gross mistreatment of women and girls who are already disadvantaged by society leaves a sour taste in my mouth. In these novels there’s always an evil black woman doing a good man wrong. Therefore she must be beaten or killed. Or raped. Never mind the guy is a straight up loser.

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  3. Saksgirl says:

    It’s the cornerstone for modern YA literature. It’s been around a while. Since about the 1920s. The latter day women movement has been confronting it as an unnecessary niche against women. It shows that the patriarch societies subconsciously wish to erase women from the lives of children and young adult. I’m not saying a motherless person is not to be pitied because they are but many do not see it as the real reason for the popularity of plot. Feud was right about some things such as this. That action reveals an ulterior motive. The same goes for the dead wife trope. With men, the character is usually divorced, absent, left the family, or anything but dead.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Now, that you mentioned it…I hadn’t realized it’s been around that long. Wow! It’s been around a really long time; Superman, Spiderman, Batman, Aquaman, all had dead mothers. Actually, Wonder Woman is the only super hero character I can think of whose mother was still alive. I take that back, Thor’s mother was still alive but that doesn’t count because she was an immortal.

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    • Bredan says:

      It maybe the cornerstone for young adult literature but it is time to give it a rest. Gee! When gray hairs start sprouting it’s time to give it up.

      Liked by 1 person

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