Some things you can’t change the meaning of no matter how much you wants to. Smirk is one of those things.

I thought about this gross misuse of a human gesture because fiction imitate life.

I wish authors would stop it! The next book I read where the character is smirking instead of affectionately smiling. I’m putting it down.

I’ve only a certain amount of time on this earth and I’m not spending anymore of it reading about smirking people. Reading books with someone trying to hoodwink me into believing their characters intentions are good.

Quit using the word smirk when referring an affectionate or silly smile.

I see it every where.

I see things like, “He walked in the room and smirked at me and I melted.”  I’m very forgiving in my readership but I keep seeing it, so, I realized it’s an attempt to change the meaning of a word that has meant the same thing since the dawn of human history.

Smirk is an expression that’s never going to mean affection no matter how much you try to make it means affection and tries to convince everyone else it does. Nor is it ever going to mean silly teasing someone.

If anyone is smirking at you then you best to get away from them. Not flirt with them. Smirking is not flirting.

You can’t change human nature.

A smirk is a smile evoking insolence, scorn, or offensive smugness. A smile in an irritatingly smug, or conceited manner.

I read a question asking why do some  men and women find a smirk attractive?

I have no idea.

The word Smirk should not be used when referring an affectionate smile  even if the character is a villain. That’s not how anyone smiles who doesn’t mean the other person  harm. Rather in reality or fiction.
If someone shoot you a smirk upon first greeting them? Then why are you surprised your relationship with them is tumultuous. That first impression told you not to get involved with them.

I have no idea why it’s so popularly used when a vast majority of women appear to find the smirk from a complete stranger or a date as arrogant and comes off as an a$$hole type of person.

Even the word titillating would be a better substitute.  That another word the meaning has changed over the means.

Words to use to describe teasing someone

In simpler terms. A smirk is a polite way of mean mugging someone.

 

 

 

 

About unholypursuit

A. White, an award winning former librarian who is also long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
This entry was posted in advice, author, authors, paranormal romance,, words and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Some things you can’t change the meaning of no matter how much you wants to. Smirk is one of those things.

  1. Unless you’re into aholes I guess

    Like

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