Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do.~Voltaire

Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do.~Voltaire

Flushed Face on Samsung One UI 3.1.1

About unholypursuit

A. White, an award winning former librarian, who is also a long time member of Romantic Time and Publisher's Weekly. A. White has been writing for over fifteen years. She took classes in creative writing in college, specializing in ancient myths and legends. and later at a local community center while living in Chicago. In college she won the national contest to verbally list every country in the world, it's capital and ingenious language. Her works are mainly horror, fantasy, extreme, and sci-fi as well as, as some may says, "the truly strange predicament and puzzling." Books that I've written are "Clash with the Immortals, and eleven others which are part of the "Unholy Pursuit saga,". She has been working on the Chronicles since 2007. She wished to complete them all before introducing them to public so the readers wouldn't have to for the continuation to be written. The ideas of the book come from classic literature such as whose work greatly influence the world world such as Homer, Sophocles, Herodotus, Euripides, Socrates, Hippocrates, Aristophanes, Plato, Aristotle and many more. The "Book of Enoch" influenced the usage of Azazael as a main character and love interest. I created the primary main character from the Chronicle of Saints. I wanted to show them as real flesh and blood with thoughts, desires and yearning as any human. Not as they are so often depicted. So I created one of my own to show her as a real human that everyone can relate to.
This entry was posted in paranormal romance,. Bookmark the permalink.

13 Responses to Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do.~Voltaire

  1. henhouselady says:

    This is a great quote.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Pingback: ReBlogging ‘Every man is guilty of all the good he did not do.~Voltaire’ – Link Below | Relationship Insights by Yernasia Quorelios

  3. We are carried along by the stream made up of insecurities, shame, anxieties, paranoia and simple fear. Modern life has become far too complicated to discriminate what is necessary and what can be let go of. Guilt can now be perceived as being universal, under these circumstances the above-mentioned phrase is too simplistic for our day and age.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for your input. Much appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I, at first thought the quote was too complicated, or perhaps too simplistic for our day and age when I at first read it. But I reread it and realized the author is talking about the good that’s within our power and ability to do, that we often do not do it. I don’t think he was referring to people with mental disorders that prevent them from functioning.

      I think it applies to any age in history, not just the modern era. Every age has its thorns.
      Sometimes taking the focus off of ourselves enable us to see the plight of others. But if all we can see is ourselves then we will never be able to see beyond ourselves. I don’t think Voltaire is talking about anything on a grandiose scale. I think he is talking about simple things that we can do to help others.

      Yes, guilt can be seen as universal for we all have entertained times we didn’t act when we should have. No one is free of that guilt. Guilt can be a good thing if it prompt the person to do better.

      Liked by 1 person

      • You might want to read “Voltaire’s Bastards” by John Ralston Saul, cheers.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Thanks for introducing me to an author I never read before. I’m not familiar with this author’s work therefore I can not express an opinion. I will look into reading it.

          A reader named Sherwood Smith said: “Alas, what I found was a personal essay masquerading as a historical overview. Page after page of unsupported opinion offered as fact, sometimes as judgments about individuals.”

          I do not let others review influence whether or not I read a book.

          I am familiar with François-Marie Arouet’s philosphy, known by his nom de plume Voltaire, he’s required in college philosophy. He was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his criticism of Christianity—especially the Roman Catholic Church—as well as his advocacy of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state. In the 17th century the Catholic Church had a lot of power. Those who influenced him include John Locke, René Descartes, Isaac Newton, men whose way of thinking changed the word.

          Here, I think Voltaire was talking about the simple things we see every day that each and every one of us can do to make someone’s life better. It doesn’t take the involvement of anyone other than yourself and the person whom you’re doing the good deed for.

          Once I had a man stop and helped me changed a flat tire. As far as I know, he didn’t consult anyone before stopping in the rain to help me. He could have kept going and said, “Why don’t that person called AAA,” because it was cold and rainy that day, but he didn’t. These are the kinds of random acts of kindness I’m talking about and used Voltaire to say it. Whatever that man who changed the tire political views were….I don’t know. I didn’t ask him and he didn’t volunteer them. I held the umbrella over him as he changed the tire. We said nothing but when he finished I asked, “How much do I owe?”
          He smiled and said, “Nothing, have a safe trip.”

          Once I was carrying a heavy load up a hill and a teenager walking ahead of me, turned around and asked did I need any help. I told him yes. He grabbed the heaviest of the two bags and carried them to my home. We said nothing but when we got to my door I asked him, “How much do I owe?”
          He smiled and said, “Nothing,” and walked away.

          I’m fully aware people do not always practice what they preach.:)

          Liked by 1 person

          • My criticism is predominantly addressed to the change in the perception of reality. For past generations, cultural shifts moved in gradual steps and adjustments felt more natural. Since the industrial revolution, those shifts have increased in speed but were still observable. The influence modern technologies exert now on our language and psychological constitution can barely be recorded before a new newness is taking over. For example, young people rarely understand the concept of integrity, their self-worth depends on their social media connections; material goods are perceived as the only worthwhile secure achievement. The value of emotion has been reduced to a virtual experience, which now can be downloaded from the net.
            We are undergoing a seismic shift in ethical philosophy that has never been seen before throughout human history and might be necessary to secure our survival.

            Liked by 1 person

            • The influence modern technologies exert now on our language and psychological constitution can barely be recorded before a new newness is taking over. For example, young people rarely understand the concept of integrity, their self-worth depends on their social media connections; material goods are perceived as the only worthwhile secure achievement. The value of emotion has been reduced to a virtual experience, which now can be downloaded from the net.
              We are undergoing a seismic shift in ethical philosophy that has never been seen before throughout human history and might be necessary to secure our survival.

              I agree that changes are occurring so fast that they leave honor and value in nothing.

              When Oscar Wilde penned his famous definition of a cynic – “Nowadays people know the price of everything and the value of nothing. Something went wrong.” – he might as well have been talking about today’s advertising and marketing professionals. … A strong brand is important because it commands a higher price. Apparently what we are seeing today started over two hundred years ago with the start of the industrial revolution. .

              Despite the constant changes waving in the winds, some are good and some are not. But an individual person must decide for themselves what they will hold on to and what they are willing to change and let go of. If a behavior or belief is harmful to others and sometimes to the ones who practice it, then it’s time to let go. But if not, then I see nothing wrong with holding on to what you may consider a tradition.

              For example, I’m a writer and I certainly haven’t change many things in my writing to the so-called modern quick way of writing. I know I write in a much older style but there’s an audience for it.

              Liked by 1 person

  4. Haze says:

    I believe that everyone is capable of doing some good deeds if they try. The problem is not enough people try.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Kisha says:

    Very true.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.